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Attività seminariale del Dipartimento


Il Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, nell'ambito delle attività di formazione e divulgazione scientifica, organizza periodicamente cicli di seminari a carattere scientifico e di orientamento nel mondo del lavoro.

I seminari sono tenuti da relatori provenienti da Università e Centri di Ricerca italiani ed esteri.
Sono rivolti agli studenti e neo laureati del percorso formativo di riferimento, ma sono aperti a tutti gli interessati.

Programmazione


Size dependent behaviour of intact rocks: recent findings and future direction - Prof. Hossein Masoumi - 28 febbraio h. 11 @ Aula 4 DST

Mercoledì 28 febbraio 2024 ore 11:00-Mercoledì 28 febbraio 2024 ore 13:00Immagine

The design of structures on or within rock masses requires an estimate of the strength of the intact rock blocks within the mass. These blocks of rock can be many orders of magnitude greater in size than laboratory samples typically tested. The properties obtained from these samples must therefore be ‘scaled’ to equivalent field values. This presentation talks about current methods for scaling strength and other rock properties and, in lieu of noted limitations, presents a constitutive model for intact rock that incorporates size effect. It also includes recent findings and works published regarding size or scale effects in intact rocks under various loading conditions.

The Speaker: Prof. Hossein Masoumi (Monash University)

Prof. Masoumi graduated from Tehran University, Iran with Bachelor of Science degree in Mining Engineering in 2007 and completed the level ofMaster of Mining Engineering, major in Mine Geomechanics and Mine Management in 2009 at the School of Mining Engineering, UNSW. He received his PhD degree in Geotechnical Engineering from the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, UNSW in 2013. He had been an Associate Lecturer at the School of Mining Engineering from 2012 till 2016. He promoted to Lecturer in 2016 at UNSW and then moved to Monash University in Jan 2018 as a Senior Lecturer followed by his promotion in July 2022 to Associate Professor position. Currently, he is the Leader of Resources Engineering and Head of Resources Group at Monash University. He also holds the role of Director of Education at the Department of Civil Engineering, Monash University. His main research lies in the field of rock mechanics with particular interest in size/scale and shape effects on intact rocks. Constitutive modelling of intact rock exhibiting size/scale dependent behaviour under uniaxial and triaxial conditions is the key aspect of his research interest.

On site: h. 11am Aula 4, DST

Contacts: geoseminar.dst@unito.it

  • Allegato (2.1 MB)
  • Seminario: "A dive into scientific ocean drilling: insights from the International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP)" - 5 febbraio, h16 Aula Ruffini

    Immagine

    The International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) is an international marine research organisation leader in the deep-ocean scientific drilling. This long-standing scientific program has provided ocean research platforms capable of accessing Earth's challenging environments below the seafloor. Collaboration between scientists and technical staff has allowed the recovery of ocean sediments and rock cores and the collection of high-resolution data at local and global scales over a wide time range (from human to geological time scales). The recovered data have enabled scientists to better understand the evolution of our planet and shed light on key aspects of climate change, oceanic circulation, life within the subseafloor, and geodynamic and deep Earth processes.

    This seminar intends to provide a general overview about the IODP program, and operational and research activities at sea. Insights will be provided on key aspects of the past and ongoing research related to oceanic drilling, with a focus on upcoming scheduled expeditions (e.g., IODP Expedition 402 - Tyrrhenian Continent-Ocean Transition) and future programs. I will give information on how to get involved in the program, access datasets and samples, and follow the next expedition in real time.

     

    The Speaker: Claudio Robustelli (International Ocean Discovery Program)

    Claudio Robustelli Test is a temporary marine technician at IODP (Texas A&M) and an early career paleomagnetist. During his PhD at UniTO and the CIMaN-ALP Alpine Laboratory of Paleomagnetism (Peveragno, Italy), he worked on rock magnetic properties in exhumed analogues of actual accretionary prisms. He sailed as a marine technician during IODP Expedition 395 – Reykjanes Mantle Convection and Climate, and as a paleomagnetist during IODP Expedition 393 - South Atlantic Transect II. His research applies paleomagnetic and rock magnetic methods to highlight alteration of mid-ocean-ridge basalts (MORBs) due to seawater-rock interaction and its influence on magnetic anomalies.

    On site: h. 4 pm Aula Ruffini, DST

    Remote: via webex at this link

    Contacts: geoseminar.dst@unito.it

  • Allegato (2.8 MB)
  • Project Opportunities for Minerals Engineers Under the Erasmus+ Programme - Oktay Sahbaz (lunedì 29 gennaio ore 14:00, Aula Ruffini)

    Lunedì 29 gennaio 2024 ore 14:00-Lunedì 29 gennaio 2024 ore 15:30Immagine

    Erasmus+ is the EU's programme to support education, training, youth and sport. The programme provide opportunities for students, researchers and institutions. The activities supported under the Erasmus+ Program are mainly grouped under three Key Actions (KA) and a Special Action called as Jean Monnet.KA1 is “Learning Mobility for the Individuals”, while KA2 is “Cooperation Among Organisations and Institutions”. The KA2 supports universities to produce “more attractive education and training programmes, participatory approaches and digital methodologies, newcomer curricula, more strategic and integrated use of ICTs and open educational resources and so on”. Thus, with a budget of €28.4 billion, the program supports work in areas that not only Europe but also the world needs. Undoubtedly, some of these areas are geology, mining and mineral processing. Therefore, I would like to introduce you some of my projects that have been supported, especially in the field of mining and mineral processing, to show how you can turn your similar ideas into projects. I will also share information on why and how we need to attract more young people to the field of mining and geology, where there will be a gray tsunami. I will also share with you details about “HoloGEM” and “DigiRescueMe” Projects, including search and rescue in mines, occupational health and safety in mining and mineral processing, green mining, VR-AR applications in mining. As a result, I will present you approaches that give you the opportunity to realize your ideas with international partnerships.

    Erasmus+ is the EU's programme to support education, training, youth and sport. The programme provide opportunities for students, researchers and institutions. The activities supported under the Erasmus+ Program are mainly grouped under three Key Actions (KA) and a Special Action called as Jean Monnet.KA1 is “Learning Mobility for the Individuals”, while KA2 is “Cooperation Among Organisations and Institutions”. The KA2 supports universities to produce “more attractive education and training programmes, participatory approaches and digital methodologies, newcomer curricula, more strategic and integrated use of ICTs and open educational resources and so on”. Thus, with a budget of €28.4 billion, the program supports work in areas that not only Europe but also the world needs. Undoubtedly, some of these areas are geology, mining and mineral processing. Therefore, I would like to introduce you some of my projects that have been supported, especially in the field of mining and mineral processing, to show how you can turn your similar ideas into projects. I will also share information on why and how we need to attract more young people to the field of mining and geology, where there will be a gray tsunami. I will also share with you details about “HoloGEM” and “DigiRescueMe” Projects, including search and rescue in mines, occupational health and safety in mining and mineral processing, green mining, VR-AR applications in mining. As a result, I will present you approaches that give you the opportunity to realize your ideas with international partnerships.

    The Speaker: Prof. Oktay Sahbaz (Department of Mining, Dumlupinar University-Turkiye)

    Oktay SAHBAZ is Professor of Mineral Processing at the Department of Mining, Dumlupinar University-Turkiye. He is a section editor in Physicochemical Problems in Mineral Processing Journal. He has worked as a project manager/coordinator in 12 different international projects in the frame of the Erasmus+ Key Action 2: Strategic Partnership Calls and CBHE (Capacity Building for Higher Education) Calls since 2016. He has more than 50 international publications, including subjects on mineral processing and flotation, occupational health and safety, educational methods, and so on.

    On site: h. 2 pm Aula Ruffini, DST

    Remote: via webex at this link

    Contacts: geoseminar.dst@unito.it

  • Allegato (1.7 MB)
  • Working with hot rocks: challenges and new opportunities - Omar Bartoli (Università di Padova, Italy) - 14-12-2023 @11AM - Aula 4 DST

    Giovedì 14 dicembre 2023 ore 11:00Immagine

    Granulites and migmatites are important constituents of the roots of continents and represent key rocks to investigate mass and heat transport and to interpret the evolution of orogenic belts and interactions between crust and mantle. The integration of detailed microstructural studies with geochronology, geochemistry and phase equilibrium diagram investigations allowed to solve important issues related to hot rocks. However, the continuous improvement of existing and new analytical and computational techniques has demonstrated that the thermodynamic equilibrium paradigm cannot explain all the complexity of continuously evolving systems such as migmatitic and granulitic rocks. Trying to reconcile models and nature is often a tricky task for petrologists and geochronologists. For example, there is currently no consensus concerning the mechanisms and timescales by which extremely hot crustal conditions are achieved.

    In this seminar, I will elucidate the main challenges related to the reconstruction of the thermal and temporal evolution of high-grade metamorphic terranes and I will present opportunities for new research insights.    

     

    The speaker: Omar Bartoli (Università di Padova, Italy)

    Omar Bartoli is Associate Professor of Petrology at the Department of Geosciences, University of Padova. He is specialized in the study of crustal anatexis and anatectic granites. He combines field and microstructural observations with in situ geochemical data and computational and experimental petrology.

    On site: h. 11am Aula 4, DST

    Remote: via webex at this link

    Contacts: geoseminar.dst@unito.it

  • Allegato (4.1 MB)
  • Sulfur cycle and its implication for Earth surface biogeochemistry: insights from isotope geochemistry - Laetitia Guibourdenche - 29/11/2023 4pm (Aula Pognante DST)

    Mercoledì 29 novembre 2023 ore 16:00-Mercoledì 29 novembre 2023 ore 17:00Immagine

    Sulfur, in its most oxidized form - sulfate (SO42-)- stands as the second most prevalent anion in seawater, surpassing oxygen concentration by about 150 times. This abundance establishes sulfate as the largest oxidant reservoir, crucial for decomposing organic matter sinking to the ocean floor. Microbial sulfate reduction, thermodynamically favorable over methanogenesis in organic carbon respiration, and its involvement in anaerobic methane oxidation collectively contribute to the mitigation of methane emissions into the atmosphere. The concentration of sulfate in the ocean holds paramount implications for Earth's oxidation state and carbon cycle. This concentration is intricately regulated by the fluxes of sulfur-bearing minerals from weathering and burial, volcanic degassing, and hydrothermal activity, all of which exert feedback on ocean biogeochemistry. Finally, sulfate bearing minerals often buried in association with organic matter can fuel microbial activity leading to the degradation of hydrocarbon and to the diagenetic formation of authigenic carbonate and native sulfur. In this seminar, I will elucidate the potential of isotopic measurements of sulfate and sulfide-bearing minerals. These measurements serve as a powerful tool to investigate both global and local shifts in the sedimentary sulfur cycle, spanning modern to ancient environments. I will outline how sulfur isotopes aid in highlighting Earth's oxygenation events, offer stringent constraints on ocean biogeochemistry across geological epochs, and provide insights into intricate redox cycling processes in contemporary settings sensitive to anthropogenic influences.

     

    The speaker: Laetitia Guibourdenche (Institute de Physique du Globe, Paris)

    Laetitia Guibourdenche is a researcher in isotope geochemistry specialized in the study of biogeochemical cycling in past and present marine environments. During her PhD she studied the Messinian Salinity Crisis with a primary focus on the formation of gypsum evaporitic minerals. Her research linked this significant environmental crisis to profound changes in the sulfur and carbon cycles, providing insight into the dynamic biogechemical interactions shaping the Mediterranean sea basins toward the end of the Miocene.

     

    On site: h. 4 pm Aula Pognante, DST

    Remote: via webex at this link

    Contacts: geoseminar.dst@unito.it

  • Allegato (2.4 MB)
  • A new insight into the Late Miocene- Early Pliocene Biogenic Bloom - Maria Elena Gastaldello (University of Padova) - 23/10/2023 ore 14:00 Aula Pognante

    Lunedì 23 ottobre 2023 ore 14:00-Lunedì 23 ottobre 2023 ore 16:00Immagine

    The Late Miocene-Early Pliocene Biogenic Bloom (~ 9-3.5 Ma) is a paleoceanographic phenomenon defined by anomalously high marine biological productivity. Marine sedimentary records in the Indian, Pacific, and Atlantic oceans, point to a significant increase in primary productivity maintained for several millions of years. Surface primary productivity is typically limited by the availability of nutrients, whose residence times are fairly short in the global ocean. Therefore, the global nature and the multimillion years duration of the Biogenic Bloom makes this phenomenon a paleoceanographic puzzle. Two main explanations for these anomalously high productivity conditions have been proposed: a major redistribution of nutrients triggering an intensification of regional upwelling; or an absolute increase of nutrients delivery to the oceans. The widespread signal and common patterns of the Biogenic Bloom point to global forcing. However, recent palaeoceanographic studies provide evidence for regional differences in its expression and timing, and underline the importance of studying regional scale processes to fully understand this phenomenon.

     

    The speaker:

    Maria Elena Gastaldello is a PhD student at the University of Padova, specialized in micropaleontology and paleoceanography. Her PhD project aims to reconstruct the paleoceanographic and paleoenvironmental changes at the seafloor during the Late Miocene-Early Pliocene Biogenic Bloom phenomenon. She combines micropaleontological analyses (benthic foraminifera, calcareous nannofossils) with geochemical proxies (e.g. oxygen and carbon stable isotopes, carbonate content).

    On site: h. 14:00 Aula Pognante, DST

    Remote: via webex at this link

    Contacts: geoseminar.dst@unito.it

  • Allegato (2.1 MB)

     

     

     

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